• Major N.A. Miller – 224th Parachute Field Ambulance, RAMC

    My grandfather, Nathaniel Miller FRCS (Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons) was a doctor in peacetime, and during WWII became a Major in the Royal Army Medical Corps (a British Army specialist corps providing medical services to all British Army personnel and their families in time of war and peace). This photo (below) hangs on my wall at home, taken in December 1944, several months after their unit’s involvement in the D-Day landings and Pegasus Bridge (a story for another day) and taken 5 months before the liberation of Bergen-Belsen. My grandfather is third from the right, front row, Major N.A. Miller. On 15 April 1945 Major Miller headed…

  • Evan Griffiths – Mobile Field Hospital

    Consultant surgeon Bridgend hospitals, south Wales, 1951-60, consultant geriatrician Wrexham Maelor Hospital, north Wales, 1961-81 (b Llanelly 1916; q St Bartholomew’s 1940; FRCSEd, FRCS), died from a myocardial infarction on 28 July 1998.  368 total views

  • Sir William Melville Arnott

    Physician, soldier and university administrator, William Melville Amott, known as ‘Melville’, was one of the last of a generation of academic physicians whose professional careers started in the 1930s when medical science was beginning to emerge as an important discipline.  375 total views

  • Major Harold Daintree Johnson, 224 Parachute Field Ambulance

    On 15 April 1945 224 Parachute Field Ambulance was the first medical team that went into Bergen-Belsen. Below is the army description of the situation found, in efficient military language, taken from the archives of 224th Parachute Field Ambulance, Royal Army Medical Corps.  575 total views

  • Hugh J Campbell (Lt.)

    I have a photo of my father there. His platoon was the unit that found the place. He was a combat veteran but he once said to me of all the torments his mind kept reminding him of this was the most vivid. He never got over it.  411 total views

  • Maj Benjamin George Barnett (63rd ATR)

    Major Ben Barnett, one of the first British officers to arrive at Belsen, wrote: “There are no words in the English language that can give a true impression of the ghastly horrors of this camp.”  339 total views