• Desmond Hawkins (Medical Student)

    Desmond Hawkins’ early medical career was heavily affected by the Second World War. As a student he was involved in the early treatment of casualties from the Normandy landings and later he was in one of the first medical teams to enter the Belsen concentration camp after its liberation.  33 total views

  • Alan Willoughby, AFS

    Alan served in WWII as an ambulance driver for the British army all across Europe by way of the American Field Service. He was there for the liberation of the Bergen-Belsen Concentration Camp. He loved his country and was proud of everything he could do to support it.  42 total views

  • Colonel Michael Osborn

    Colonel Osborn was one of the first to enter Belsen concentration camp, and what he discovered stayed with him for the rest of his life. Shortly after that he liberated his brother Myles from a prisoner of war camp. They had not seen each other for more than 10 years.  76 total views

  • Laurence Wand – Medical Student (St. Barts)

    “You see, there was a war still being fought…There was a CCS, there was 32 CCS, there was an anti-aircraft regiment and there was a control unit, there were a few British Army units which had been allowed to be in reserve at Belsen, but their primary function was not to look after Belsen, their primary function was to back up the 21st Army Group in trying to get that war over and there was very little that could be spared.”  63 total views

  • Acton Henry Gordon Gibbon (Spud)

    Spud Gibbon was the son of a colonel in the royal army medical corp who was from Sleedagh near Murrintown in Wexford – an ancestor was the historian Edward Gibbon, author of The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire.  44 total views

  • Marjorie Ashbery

    THE Post has been researching the life of a local woman, who was involved in a remarkable event in world history — the relief of the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp in 1945.  47 total views

  • Rev. Charles Parsons

    My Great Grandfather, The Reverend Charles Martin King Parsons CF was an army chaplain with the 9th British General Hospital during WW2.  83 total views