The Liberation of Bergen Belsen Concentration Camp

Welcome this new archive relating and dedicated to the men and women service personnel and the part they played at the Liberation and subsequent Humanitarian Effort of the Bergen Belsen Concentration Camp in 1945.

We are now inviting any relatives of service personnel who may have been at the camp to get in touch. We do not believe there are any records of the diverse group of men and women, many completely untrained, who were involved with the camp, after it’s liberation.

Those That Served

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Showing 10 most recent names in this directory
Rodger, George
George Rodger (19 March 1908 – 24 July 1995) was a British photojournalist noted for his work in photographing the mass deaths at Bergen-Belsen concentration camp at the end of the Second World War. More
Submitted by: Belsen Archive

Midgley, Norman (AFPU)
No 5 Army Film and Photographic Unit (AFPU) More
Submitted by: Belsen Archive

Vaughan-Thomas, Wynford
War correspondent for the BBC. Reported at Belsen. More
Submitted by: Belsen Archive

Morris, George
George Morris, Royal Armoured Corps, was from Bradford, West Yorkshire. He arrived at Bergen-Belsen concentration camp 13 days after it had been liberated. More
Submitted by: Belsen Archive

Elliott, John
My father Staff Sargent John Elliott of the Dental Corps was one of the first people to be in the capture of Bergen-Belsen Camp. He had to work hard in the first days as some German troops who had been the guards came to the hospital with broken jaws; the result of blows to the jaw by the butts of the first British soldiers who had fought their way into the camp. He then went on with the Army Hospital to secure the sanitanization of the camp before the huts were burned to eradicate any further diseases. He eventually fought with the Army Hospital all the way to Hannover where he was when the war ended.
Submitted by: Belsen Archive

Wells, Sidney David (14th LFA, RAMC)
14th Light Field Ambulance, RAMC He was sent to France with the B.E.F. At Dunkirk they drew lots which let him try to get back to England. He was lifted off the mole by an almost new Destroyer with only one set of rear guns and two sets of torpedo tubes believed to be HMS Harvester. The unit was then sent to North Africa, Syria(attached to Australians), back to north Africa. For a time he was an orderly in an American Field Service ambulance. These were volunteer American drivers and dodge ambulances supplied by the American Red Cross. After North Africa he was in Italy before returning to the UK for the Normandy landings. From then on to Belgium, Holland and Germany. He did not often talk of his experiences. Once he said that after large tank battle the M.O. was with them and if the casualty was beyond help they would be given an excess of morphine. He was also at Bergen-Belsen a few days after it was liberated and said if you were not there in person you would not be able to take it all in. All the years I knew him he never used the word ambulance it was always a Blood Wagon. After the war he worked at Betteshanger Colliery in Kent as a male nurse
Submitted by: Norman Wells

Diack, Bill
2nd Fife and Forfar Yeomanry
Submitted by: Belsen Archive

Roberts, Arthur (113 LAA) Sergeant
1516030 My grandfather was with 113 LAA - Sergeant Arthur Roberts 1516030. It was his second time in Europe having narrowly escaped with the BEF at Dunkirk. Arthur returned to England after the war and had a successful career finding oil in the North Sea for BP
Submitted by: Simon Chapman

Plevin, John Sherwood
4th Battalion KSLI.
Submitted by: Paula Morgan

Layton, T.V. Dr Senior Medical Officer
Arrived with Muriel Doherty (Matron) on 11th July 1945 More
Submitted by: Belsen Archive


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Latest Entries
Liberation of Bergen Belsen
Liberation of Bergen Belsen
Despite the annual britishness tweets of the liberation of Belsen, there is no memorial at the site for all the Read more
Liberation of Bergen Belsen
George Rodger (19 March 1908 – 24 July 1995) was a British photojournalist noted for his work for photographing the Read more
Liberation of Bergen Belsen
Son of Jewish Polish refugees who had migrated to Britain before WWI, Cameraman Sergeant Mike Lewis was part of the Read more
Liberation of Bergen Belsen
Sgt Harry Oakes, cine cameraman and photographer with No 5 Army Film and Photographic Unit, poses with his cine camera Read more
Liberation of Bergen Belsen
Lt Alan Wilson of Glasgow, is dusted with DDT (to protect him from typhus) before entering the camp. 20th April Read more
Liberation of Bergen Belsen
The Army Film and Photographic Unit was a subdivision of the British armed forces set up on 24 October 1941, Read more
Liberation of Bergen Belsen
AFPU film cameraman and photographer, Sergeant Richard Leatherbarrow relaxes with three former women camp inmates at Belsen. Sgt Leatherbarrow served Read more
Liberation of Bergen Belsen
George Morris, Royal Armoured Corps, was from Bradford, West Yorkshire. He arrived at Bergen-Belsen concentration camp 13 days after it Read more
Liberation of Bergen Belsen
“My uncle and his "brothers". RCAF - 440. He’s holding a stray puppy they adopted. Taken after they helped liberate Read more
Liberation of Bergen Belsen
Swansea-born journalist and presenter who came to prominence as a war correspondent for the BBC, reporting on events including the Read more

Having trouble submitting a name? Please email us instead: liberator@belsen.co.uk – Thank you

This site will progress and I’d encourage anyone with any info to get in touch. My granddad, Reg Price served with the 113th Durham Light Infantry*, as part of 369 Battery. As a signwriter, he produced this sign…

Liberation of Bergen Belsen Concentration Camp
The Sign at the Liberation of Bergen Belsen Concentration Camp

And this was kept in the family for years – so for the 75th anniversary of the Liberation of Belsen in 2020, subsequent VE Day and VJ Day, I thought it’s about time I’d try to find out more about Reg – his comrades (many of which are names, simply written on the back of photos), what they did together and for a way to remember them all, properly.

To coinicide with the anniversary, I was able to be filmed both on national and local BBC TV to tell Reg’s Story.
Whilst this was totally out of my comfort zone and I dreaded every moment – I decided I needed to do something to start this all off. BBC Midlands Today aired 7th May and a VE Day Antiques Roadshow Special aired Sunday 10th May.

Read here about The Heroes of Belsen.

The main photo, shown here was coloured for the 75th Anniversary and we’ll tell you all about it shortly – and what happened next!

*Just 113th Durham Light Infantry? No we are interested in all Service and Medical personnel who took part during the humanitarian effort at Belsen Concentration Camp. Their roles and names are largely forgotten, as many were too horrified to ever speak of what they had to do, so this archive seeks to form a tribute to ALL those that were there, to find out more and to remember them.
If you have a relative, or any info, on the relief effort at Belsen, we’d love you to please get in touch. Email us: liberator@belsen.co.uk – Thank you

***

The Liberation of Bergen Belsen Concentration Camp

Any 113th Durham Light Infantry friends or family are encouraged to get in touch via 113th@belsen.co.uk

** In 1938 the old 5th Battalion DLI changed its role to Searchlights and then in 1940 to Anti-Aircraft. This 113th Light Anti-Aircraft Regiment went to Normandy in June 1944 and joined the advance into Germany in early 1945.
Official designation – Brigade: 100 AA • Division: 30 Corps. • Unit: 113 LAA Regt. RA (DLI) TA.

The Liberation of Bergen Belsen Concentration Camp

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